PACT project history

 

PACT PROJECT HISTORY
1995 – Community activists from the Eagleston Square district of Roxbury—a neighborhood in south Boston—approach PIH to help establish a collaborative project to train people from inner-city Boston to improve conditions in their communities, which suffer from some of the worst health indicators in the United States. The work begins by training community members (called Soldados de Salud or Soldiers of Health) to teach their friends and neighbors about health promotion and harm reduction and to ensure that everyone is optimally accessing and utilizing health care and social services.
1998 – Soldiers of Health receives seed funding from the Office of Minority Health to create the PACT (Prevention and Access to Care and Treatment) Project, a program whose soldados specifically focus on HIV prevention among high risk youth and injection drug users as well as HIV health promotion and adherence support among neighborhood residents struggling with HIV/AIDS disease.
2001 – PACT separates from Soldados de Salud and becomes a key program of the Divisioin of Social Medicine and Health Inequalities at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a new division formed by Drs. Jim Kim, Paul Farmer, Howard Hiatt, and Victor Dzau whose goal was to develop the science of high quality and equitable global health services implementation to an academic medical center.
2002 – PACT receives funding from the Center for AIDS Research at Partners, Inc to initiate its DOT-Plus program which combines health promotion with directly observed therapy (DOT) of antiretroviral medications. Patients in the program receive free or very low-cost medications by trained DOT specialists. PACT also receives funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to begin a program called Fuerza Latina (Latin Strength), a comprehensive HIV and substance abuse prevention initiative targeting Latino injection drug users. The Fuerza Latina curriculum leads its participants through stages of personal recovery, leadership development, and community organizing.
2004 – PACT launches Youth for Prevention, Action and Change through Thought (YPACT) to empower at-risk Boston teens.  PACT receives three years of funding from the Rx Foundation to develop its health promotion program for HIV-positive adults in the Boston area and expands its catchment area to include most inner city neighborhoods of Boston.
2005 & 2006 – PACT relocates into the heart of the community it serves, opening a new office in Codman Square, Dorchester—a neighborhood located in south Boston. From its new headquarters, the program continues to expand its outreach in the Greater Boston area, adding health centers in several communities north of Boston as well as communities in Cambridge and Somerville to its growing referral network.
2007 & 2008 – The project expands its DOT-Plus patient quota by optimizing project administration and builds a team to respond to requests for assistance in replicating the model in other US locations including NYC, Miami, and the Navajo Nation.
2009 – PACT launches a new project utilizing community health workers (CHWs) to support patients with diabetes, beginning with 150 patients, and begins a feasibility study on the integration of CHWs into community health centers. PACT develops a generalist model allowing for the adaptability of the CHW model for patients suffering from multiple illnesses.
2010 & 2011 – PACT collaborates with the Commonwealth Care Alliance and Network Health, and Commonwealth of Massachusetts Medicaid managed organization, to extend the organization’s CHW program to various at-risk groups receiving health care through the sate’s Medicaid system. This project targets complex patients, those having two or more chronic conditions—which may include mental illness, substance abuse, diabetes, hypertension and high blood pressure—the combination of which make these patients frequent visitors of the ER and a high-cost part of the health care system. PACT continues to support its core HIV/AIDS program and to ramp up efforts to serve complex chronic care patients.  Both endeavors use the CHW model to provide better health outcomes for complex patients while working to make health care more efficient and cost effective.

1995 – Community activists from the Eagleston Square district of Roxbury—a neighborhood in south Boston—approach PIH to help establish a collaborative project to train people from inner-city Boston to improve conditions in their communities, which suffer from some of the worst health indicators in the United States. The work begins by training community members (called Soldados de Salud or Soldiers of Health) to teach their friends and neighbors about health promotion and harm reduction and to ensure that everyone is optimally accessing and utilizing health care and social services.

1998 – Soldiers of Health receives seed funding from the Office of Minority Health to create the PACT (Prevention and Access to Care and Treatment) Project, a program whose soldados specifically focus on HIV prevention among high risk youth and injection drug users as well as HIV health promotion and adherence support among neighborhood residents struggling with HIV/AIDS disease.

2001 – PACT separates from Soldados de Salud and becomes a key program of the Divisioin of Social Medicine and Health Inequalities at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a new division formed by Drs. Jim Kim, Paul Farmer, Howard Hiatt, and Victor Dzau whose goal was to develop the science of high quality and equitable global health services implementation to an academic medical center.

2002 – PACT receives funding from the Center for AIDS Research at Partners, Inc to initiate its DOT-Plus program which combines health promotion with directly observed therapy (DOT) of antiretroviral medications. Patients in the program receive free or very low-cost medications by trained DOT specialists. PACT also receives funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to begin a program called Fuerza Latina (Latin Strength), a comprehensive HIV and substance abuse prevention initiative targeting Latino injection drug users. The Fuerza Latina curriculum leads its participants through stages of personal recovery, leadership development, and community organizing.

2004 – PACT launches Youth for Prevention, Action and Change through Thought (YPACT) to empower at-risk Boston teens. PACT receives three years of funding from the Rx Foundation to develop its health promotion program for HIV-positive adults in the Boston area and expands its catchment area to include most inner city neighborhoods of Boston.

2005 & 2006 – PACT relocates into the heart of the community it serves, opening a new office in Codman Square, Dorchester—a neighborhood located in south Boston. From its new headquarters, the program continues to expand its outreach in the Greater Boston area, adding health centers in several communities north of Boston as well as communities in Cambridge and Somerville to its growing referral network.

2007 & 2008 – The project expands its DOT-Plus patient quota by optimizing project administration and builds a team to respond to requests for assistance in replicating the model in other US locations including NYC, Miami, and the Navajo Nation.

2009 – PACT launches a new project utilizing community health workers (CHWs) to support patients with diabetes, beginning with 150 patients, and begins a feasibility study on the integration of CHWs into community health centers. PACT develops a generalist model allowing for the adaptability of the CHW model for patients suffering from multiple illnesses.

2010 & 2011 – PACT collaborates with the Commonwealth Care Alliance and Network Health, and Commonwealth of Massachusetts Medicaid managed organization, to extend the organization’s CHW program to various at-risk groups receiving health care through the sate’s Medicaid system. This project targets complex patients, those having two or more chronic conditions—which may include mental illness, substance abuse, diabetes, hypertension and high blood pressure—the combination of which make these patients frequent visitors of the ER and a high-cost part of the health care system. PACT continues to support its core HIV/AIDS program and to ramp up efforts to serve complex chronic care patients.  Both endeavors use the CHW model to provide better health outcomes for complex patients while working to make health care more efficient and cost effective.